Designing From Nature Yields The Biggest Breakthroughs

Diverting from the usual, I want to talk about design, and I want to talk about it outside of the context of high-priced consulting firms (for which I work) and Amazon Echo and the iPod. In fact, I quite literally want to talk about design outside. Nature’s design, besides being a popular buzzword among church clergy, has and will continue to shape what we consider beautiful like the Echo and iPod. Perhaps more importantly, design derived from plants and animals has and will continue to lay the groundwork for the most beautiful and innovative man-made creations in history.

This last statement seems dramatic, but over the last few months, I’ve run across a few examples that demonstrate the evidence that nature does not just inform the finer arts, but widely inspires groundbreaking technologies. For concision, I’m going to select just a few examples of how nature can change the course of human progress, past and ongoing, to prime a further discussion.

Wilbur Wright was inspired by birds in flight. This is a fairly well-known piece of history, but until reading the brothers’ biography by David McCullough, I did not understand the depth of intense study that Wilbur conducted in order to comprehend the science of flight – why buzzards had a certain wing shape, why certain birds were able to fly without wind, and even why birds arched or flared their wings to remain at their preferred height. The design of different birds inspired part of the design of their initial Flyers, and Wilbur continued to leverage birds to test his theories and formulas of aeronautics.

Microsoft is storing data in the form of DNA. As a contemporary example, Microsoft teams are developing a revolutionary way to store data, using DNA as their template. Through the use of A,C,T, and G to store information instead of the standard binary 0 and 1, they’re able to store exponentially more data on the same amount of space. 

These are 2 examples of conscious design derived from nature. But plenty other inventions that have shaped human history were undoubtedly inspired by mimicking nature. The compass is a direct interaction with natural magnetic fields, and SONAR is used by dolphins for communication.

We’ve learned a lot from nature, and in many ways we have profoundly increased the velocity of human progress by listening to it. It’s hard to believe that there aren’t many more groundbreaking, history-altering natural designs staring us square in the face.

From a transportation perspective, can we learn from nature as to how to integrate forms of transportation in the most efficient and safe ways? How does the largest organism on earth, a quaking aspen tree network, deliver nutrients and information correctly and evenly in order to stay alive?

This is the type of question that I believe could provide some exciting answers.

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